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Full text of "Yearbook"

ISLANDER 




Thompson Academy 

Thompson's Island 
South Boston, Massachusetts 




1973 




Mr. George Wright 



Mr. Wright, the eleventh headmaster of Thompson Academy, concludes his third year in office this Spring. 
In 1970 he was promoted from Director of Studies and succeeded Mr. Dibble as headmaster. 

Halfway through his first year as headmaster, the Main Building fire destroyed a major part of the school's 
records, the office complex, staff living quarters, and almost all of the existing classrooms. Mr. Wright was 
confronted with the difficult task of rebuilding facilities and restoring a system which he had taken control 
of just a few months earlier. 

February 1971 will not be easily forgotton, and neither will Mr. Wright be forgotton for his dedication to 
the school, for his energy in rebuilding it, and for his unwavering belief in its purpose— the guidance and 
development of young men. 





L 




Mrs. IMancy Wright 



Mrs. George Wright will be long remembered by the Class of 1973 
for her enthusiastic support of all Thompson Academy activities. In 
addition to serving as hostess at many school functions, she has taught 
French, tutored, directed school plays, and served as advisor to the 
dramatics club. She has graciously remained our friend through many 
crises, and she has encouraged us always to strive for self-improve- 
ment. To Mrs. Wright we offer thanks and best wishes for the future. 




DEDICATION 



»MiiflKti« £ 





Mrs. Wilhelmina Thomas 



Mrs. Mildred Baxter 



It would be almost impossible to list the many responsibilities that are carried out daily by these two 
dedicated ladies. Their efficiency and their genuine concern for the welfare of Thompson Academy is 
seen in everything they do. 

Always willing to help someone or share advice, Mrs. Baxter and Mrs. Thomas will forever hold a spe- 
cial place in our hearts. 

Keeping a school together is no easy task, but to these two ladies we give the most credit. The Class of 
1973 is dedicating this yearbook to you who have dedicated yourselves to us. 



4 



APPRECIATION 




Mrs. Paula Pinto 



A friend in need 

We will forever remember Mrs. Pinto as a friend. She was always willing to help us and never asked for 
thanks in return. 

Mrs. Pinto was a great help in running our school newspaper, and we could not have been as successful 
without her. She was also our typing teacher, and, as ever, her patience was reassuring. 

She was there whenever we needed her, and now we have a chance to show our appreciation. From the 
Class of 1973, we thank Mrs. John D. Pinto. 



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IN MEMORIAM 




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Mr. Robert Roane Kitching 
1885 — 1972 



On November 7,1972, Thompson Academy lost its most loyal 
and long-serving member. Mr. Kitching had been a resident of 
Thompson's Island for 44 years and had lived through many 
changes in the school. 

An ardent supporter of our athletic teams, he attended games 
whenever he could. He was very fond of baseball and would 
rarely miss a home game. 

A devoted man, Mr. Kitching was held in high esteem by his 
many friends, both on and off the Island. It is hard to express 
our feelings after the loss of such a man, but what we can do is 
remember him kindly. . . . and we will. 







K 



SPECIAL TRIBUTE 




Mr. Donald S. Merry 



As a coach, a teacher, an adviser, and a person, Mr. Merry has shared many experiences with 
us during our years at Thompson Academy. His respect for the needs of the student and the 
responsibilities of the faculty was felt by all. During his four years on the Island, Mr. Merry con- 
tributed much to the school's environment. He initiated the soccer program in 1968, and in 
that year he also helped coach the lacrosse team. An accomplished, all Midwest lacrosse player 
himself, Mr. Merry took over the job as head coach during the 1969-70 season. 

Whether on the playing field, in his math classes, or in any other aspect of Thompson life, Mr. 
Merry was respected for his fairness and honesty and kept things lively at times when nothing 
else could. 

The Class of 1973 is proud to be able to express gratitude to Donald Merry for all that he has 
been to us and all that he has done for us. 



8 



ADMINISTRATION 







FACULTY 



STAFF 



9 



\ 







John D. Pinto, Jr. 

Headmaster- Elect 
Director of Studies 



At the December 20,1972 meeting of the Thompson Academy Board of Trustees, John D. Pinto of 
Westerly, Rhode Island was named to succeed George Wright as Headmaster of the Academy. Mr. Pinto 
will assume the post in June 1973 as Thompson Academy prepares to enter a new phase of development 
that will enable the School and the Island to increasingly, and more effectively, fulfill the educational, 
social, and recreational needs of a growing number of needy students from the metropolitan Boston area. 

Mr. Pinto has served as the Director of Curriculum at the Academy for four of his six years of affiliation 
with the School. Additionally, he has served as Chairman of the Mathematics Department, Yearbook 
Adviser, and Dean of Students. He is a graduate of Tabor Academy, Columbia College, and the Honey- 
well Computer Institute, and has done additional graduate work at the University of Rhode Island and 
Boston University. 



10 




David D. Tura 

Director of Admissions and Development 




John F. Quinn 

Director of Guidance 



11 




Raymond Thomas 

Assistant Headmaster 




Charles W. Baxter 

Administrative Assistant 



12 




Robert McClung 

Athletic Director 




Gerald Jordan 



Dean of Students 



13 




Mrs. Raymond Thomas 

Headmaster's Secretary 




Mrs. Charles Baxter 

School Secretary 



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Mr. Allan R. Willis 

Science Department Chairman 




Mr. William S. Peck 

English 



14 




Mr. Peter W. Weiss 



Science 




Miss Susan Sherwood 

Foreign Language 




Mr. Douglas Paige 

History 




Mr. Rafael DelValle 

Mathematics 



15 



\ 




Mr. Thomas Wellwood 

Mathematics 




Mr. John W. Horan 

Coach 




Mr. Ralph M. Lindsey 

Medical Supervisor 




Mrs. Robert McClung 



Librarian 



16 




Mr. Valerian Daigle 

Chef 





Mrs. Valerian Daigle 

Dining Room Supervisor 




Mr. Rene J. St. Pierre 

Assistant Chef 




Mrs. Phyllis L. Champagne 

Housekeeper 



17 




Mrs. Edward Roberge 

Development Secretary 




Mr. Alan W. Brown 

Groundsman 




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Mr. Ben Brown 

Maintenance 




Mr. Alphonse Grincavich 



Groundsman 



18 




Mr. Henry Collins 

Watchman 




Mr. William James 

Maintenance 




Mr. Roger Concannon 

Boat Captain 




Mrs. David D. Tura 

Hunter Ford Tura 



19 




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SENIORS 



21 



V 



Daniel Barry 



Burlington, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Danny 

Occupation: Professional baseball 

Likes: Playing sports, drinking, Friday afternoons 

Dislikes: Bonehead walking in my room 50 times 
a day. 

Favorite Subjects: History, Math 



1971-72: Varsity Baseball, Varsity Football 
1972-73: Varsity Baseball, Varsity Football 



22 




John T. Bittrich, Jr. 



Brighton, Massachusetts 



1972-73: Hockey, Golf, Stock Market Club (President), 
Chess Club 



Nickname: John 

Occupation: Criminal Justice 

Likes: A Girl, Wealth, Chess, The Ability to Succeed 

Dislikes: Economics, Midterms 

Favorite Subjects: English, Algebra 11 



23 



■\ 



Gerald Louis Bonas 



Fairhaven, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Bonehead 

Occupation: Physical Education Teacher, Football 
Coach 

Likes: Visiting the Alves with J.K., Football, Weight- 
lifting, Dancing, Meeting New Girls 

Dislikes: Wearing Ties, Work Squad 

Favorite Subjects: Biology, Health 



1971-72: Varsity Lacrosse 

1972-73: Varsity Football, Weightlifting, Honor Roll 



24 




Robert Willie Bostic 



New York, New York 



1970-71 : Junior Varsity Basketball, Junior Varsity 
Football, Chess Club, Varsity Lacrosse, Yearbook 
Staff, Newspaper Staff, Art Club, Weightlifting, 
Library Supervisor 

1971-72: Junior Varsity Basketball, Varsity Football, 
Varsity Lacrosse, Weightlifting, Chess Club, Art Club, 
Newspaper Staff, Yearbook Staff, Sociology Club 

1972-73: Basketball, Varsity Football, Varsity La- 
crosse, Chess Club, Weightlifting, Afro- American 
Society Representative, Art Club, Yearbook Staff, 
Mail Coordinator, Seahawk Club 



Nickname: Young Blood 

Occupation: Doctor 

Likes: Sports, Girls, Parties, Music, Drama, To See 
Hiram Laugh, Rene, The Ski Slope (clot) 

Dislikes: South Boston, A Heavy Schedule, Friday 
Morning Breakfast, Daisy and Blitz, Work Squad 

Favorite Subjects: Math, Foreign Language, English 



25 



■\ 



Paul Brack 



South Boston, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Hippie 

Occupation: Undecided 

Likes: Long hair. Sports, Southie 

Dislikes: Knives, Crew cuts. Other people writing 
my history 

Favorite Subjects: History, Chemistry 



1972-73: Weightlifting, Basketball, Baseball 



26 




Ferdinand A. Carangelo, Jr. 



Boston, Massachusetts 



1969-70: English Award, History Award, Science 
Award, Honor Roll, Clifton Albee Scholarship, Class 
Representative in Student Government, Varsity Soc- 
cer, Varsity Baseball, Junior Varsity Basketball 

1970-71: English Award, Math Award, Biology Award, 
History Award, Honor Roll, Class President, Clifton 
Albee Scholarship, Honor Roll, Varsity Soccer, Var- 
sity Baseball, Junior Varsity Basketball (Captain), 
Yearbook Staff 

1971-72: Saltonstall Scholarship Grant, Class Repre- 
sentative in Student Government, Newspaper Sports 
Editor, Yearbook Staff, Store Manager, Varsity Bas- 
ketball, Varsity Soccer, Varsity Golf (Captain), Var- 
sity Soccer, Honor Roll 

1972-73: Yearbook Sports Editor, Honor Roll, Class 
Representative in Student Government, Varsity Soccer, 
Varsity Hockey, Varsity Golf, Store Manager 



Nickname: Ferd 

Occupation: Undecided 

Likes: Uncle Fred and Mr. Merry, Sleep, 
Parties, Sports 

Dislikes: Classes, Injun, and The Boat 

Favorite Subjects: Basketweaving, Yoga 



27 



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David Kenneth Carey 



South Boston, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Dave 

Occupation: Police Work 

Likes: Sports 

Dislikes: Sunday Nights, Waiting 

Favorite Subjects: History, Woodworking 



1972-73: Weightlifting, Baseball 



28 




Wayne Costa 



New Bedford, Massachusetts 



1970-71: Biology Award, Junior Varsity Basketball, 
Varsity Lacrosse 

1971-72: Junior Varsity Basketball, Yearbook Staff 

1972-73: Varsity Soccer, Junior Varsity Basketball, 
Varsity Lacrosse 



Nickname: Hop 

Occupation: Undecided 

Likes: Girls, Sports, Music 

Dislikes: Plastic people. Set standards 

Favorite Subjects: Biology 



29 



Michael Connor 



South Boston, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Mike 

Occupation: Civil Service 

Likes: Sports, South ie 

Dislikes: Sunday nights. The Island, Freaks 

Favorite Subjects: Math, History 



1972-73: Weightlifting, Baseball, Senior project 



30 




Ulysses Harrell 



Boston, Massachusetts 



1971-72: Varsity Soccer, Yearbook Photographer, 
Assistant Librarian 

1972-73: Varsity Soccer, Yearbook Photographer, 
Assistant Librarian, President of the Afro-American 
Society, Secretary of the Senior Class 



Nickname: S.T. and Uly 

Occupation: Sociologist and Psychologist 

Likes: Girls, Parties, Dancing, Night Clubs, Sports 

Dislikes: A Pig for a Roommate, Moochers 

Favorite Subjects: English and History 



31 



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Nikolay Hersey 



Melrose, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Nick 

Occupation: Undecided 

Likes: My Mother, Good Food, Friends, Mr. Merry, 
Dot, Lacrosse, Music 

Dislikes: Cookies, Ties, Melrose Girls, Letter Writ- 
ing, Church, Mr. Baxter 

Favorite Subjects: English, Spanish, Biology 



1969-70: Soccer, Class Treasurer, English Award, Civics 
Award, Honor Roll 

1970-71: Soccer, Lacrosse, Class Treasurer, Newspaper 
Staff, English Award, Spanish Award, Honor Roll 

1971-72: Soccer, Lacrosse, Hockey, Newspaper Staff, 
Yearbook Literary Editor, Spanish Award, English Award, 
Saltonstall Scholarship Award 

1972-73: Soccer, Lacrosse, Class Representative, News- 
paper Staff, Yearbook Literary Editor 



32 




Carl Larson 



Natick, Massachusetts 



1971-72: Hockey 
1972-73: Football, Hockey 



Nickname: Crazy Carl 

Occupation: Being a Nut! 

Likes: German, Girls, Cars, Mouse, Restaurant, and 
The Boat 

Dislikes: Cities, Fixing my Car 

Favorite Subjects: Oceanography, German 



33 



x 



John Luciano 



Boston, Massachusetts 




Nickname: "Lucky" 
Occupation: Electrician 
Likes: Electricity, Golf, Ham Radio 
Dislikes: Getting up for breakfast 
Favorite Subjects: Science, Math 



1972-73: Golf, Electronics Club (President), Chess 
Club 



34 




Albert J. Moritz 



Woonsocket, Rhode Island 



1969-70: Junior Varsity Football, Varsity Hockey 

1970-71: Junior Varsity Football, Varsity Hockey, 
Junior Varsity Baseball, Student Representative 

1971-72: Varsity Soccer, Varsity Hockey, Varsity 
Baseball, Oceanography Award 

1972-73: Varsity Soccer, Varsity Hockey, Varsity Base- 
ball, Secretary of the Yearbook 



Nickname: Mouse 

Occupation: Physical Education Teacher, Pro Soccer 

Likes: Tonka Trucks, Building Blocks, Girls, Fast Cars 

Dislikes: Hospitals, Doctors, Beautiful Married Women, 
Homework 

Favorite Subjects: History, English, Health 



35 



K 



Michael David Munn 



Roxbury, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Sammy, Uncle Mickie, Munn 

Occupation: Architectural Designer 

Likes: E.J.K., Sports, Plays, Interesting Books, 
Competition, Cloe's Dome, Snoopy 

Dislikes: Lising, Reading Mr. Peck's Boring Books, 
Stupid Arguments with Phil Scott 

Favorite Subjects: Math, English 



1969-70: Junior Varsity Football, Hockey, Junior 
Varsity Baseball, Freshman Class Secretary, Student 
Council, Clifton E. Albee Scholarship Award, Honor 
Roll 

1970-71 : Varsity Football, Junior Varsity Basketball, 
Varsity Lacrosse, Secretary of Sophomore Class, Exec- 
utive Member of Student Council, Saltonstall Scholar 
ship Award, Yearbook Staff, Honor Roll, Newspaper 
Staff (Assistant Editor) 

1971-72: Varsity Football, Junior Varsity Basketball 
(Most Valuable Player Award), Honor Roll, Varsity 
Lacrosse, Junior Class Vice President, C Dorm Monitor, 
Newspaper Staff, Yearbook Staff, Executive Member 
of Student Council, Saltonstall Scholarship Award 

1972-73: Varsity Football, Varsity Basketball, Varsity 
Lacrosse, Seahawk Club, Senior Class Vice President, 
Editor-in-Chief of Yearbook Staff, Afro-American 
Society, Senior Class Representative 



36 




Michael Rose 



Melrose, Massachusetts 



1969-70: Junior Varsity Football, Hockey, Varsity 
Lacrosse, Class Representative, Student Council 

1970-71: Junior Varsity Basketball, Varsity Football, 
Varsity Lacrosse, Vice President Sophomore Class, 
Student Council Member 

1971-72: Varsity Football, Junior Varsity Basketball 
(Best Defense Award), Varsity Lacrosse (Captain), 
Class President, Newspaper Editor, Dorm Monitor, 
History Award 

1972-73: Varsity Soccer (Best Defense Award), Var- 
sity Lacrosse, Class President, Newspaper Editor, Busi- 
ness Manager of the Yearbook, Vice President of the 
Afro-American Society, Student Representative, Exec- 
utive Student Council, English Award, Chess Club 



Nickname: M.A.R.S. 

Occupation: Doctor 

Likes: Jil, Sports, Weekends, Black Culture, Having 
Money 

Dislikes: The Army, Ugly Girls, Long Boring Weeks, 
Being Broke 

Favorite Subjects: I don't like any but hate history 
the least 



37 



Alan McKenzie Salesman 



Roxbury, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Al 

Occupation: Undecided 

Likes: Trudy, Colorado, Sports, Girls, E.J.K. Ohio 
Players, Interesting Books 

Dislikes: Favoritism, Languid Minds, Mike Munn's 
Door, No Money 

Favorite Subjects: History 



1972-73: Varsity Football, Varsity Basketball, Var- 
sity Lacrosse, Seahawk Club, Afro-American Society 
Representative, Senior Representative, Honor Roll, 
Yearbook Staff 



38 




Phillip Scott 



Roxbury, Massachusetts 



i 



1969-70: Junior Varsity Football, Varsity Lacrosse, 
Student Council Member, Art Club 

1970-71: Varsity Football, Junior Varsity Basketball, 
Varsity Lacrosse, Student Council Representative, 
Honor Roll 

1971-72: Varsity Football, Junior Varsity Basketball 
(Most Improved Player Award), Varsity Lacrosse, (Best 
Defense Award), Honor Roll, Advanced Biology Award, 
English Award, Geometry Award, American Abroad 
Student (A.F.S.), New Dorm Supervisor, Student Coun- 
cil, Class Treasurer, Newspaper Staff 

1972-73: Varsity Football (Captain, Best Lineman 
Award), Varsity Basketball, Varsity Lacrosse, Yearbook 
Staff, Newspaper Staff, Afro- American Society, Stu- 
dent Council, Class Treasurer, Honor Roll, Seahawk 
Club, Whist Club 



Nickname: Hulk 

Occupation: Lawyer 

Likes: Food, the "Cloes", Head, Dot, Watching Hiram 
Drop 

Dislikes: Mr. Tura's Mod Clothes 

Favorite Subjects: History 



39 



■V 



Xavier Glen Scott 



Newark, New Jersey 




Nickname: X. G. 

Occupation: Black Leader 

Likes: Gwen, Sports, Being Witli My Family, 
Interesting Books 

Dislikes: Favoritism 

Favorite Subjects: Chemistry, Art, Geometry 



1970-71: Varsity Football, Junior Varsity Basket- 
ball, Junior Varsity Baseball, Junior Athlete Award, 
Music Club, Newspaper Staff, Honor Roll 

1971-72: Varsity Football, Varsity Basketball (Most 
Improved Player Award), Varsity Lacrosse, Assistant 
Editor of the Yearbook, Whist Club, Chess Club, Sea- 
hawk Club, Music Club, Weightlifting Club, Class Officer, 
Honor Roll 

1972-73: Varsity Football, Varsity Basketball (Captain, 
Best Defensive Player), Varsity Lacrosse, Class Officer, 
Afro-American Society Officer, Newspaper Staff, Sports 
Writer for Yearbook, Whist Club, Seahawk Club, Honor 
Roll 



40 




James Seaman 



Newport, Rhode Island 



1971-72: Varsity Basketball, Electronics Award, 
Varsity Lacrosse 

1972-73: Varsity Football, Varsity Lacrosse, 
Honor Roll 



Nickname: Woosh 

Occupation: Electronic Engineer 

Likes: Girls, Sports, Tillie, Smiiizzzoke, Weight- 
lifting, Black Art 

Dislikes: Getting up in the morning. Being broke 

Favorite Subjects: Chemistry, Art, Geometry 



41 



\ 



Charles Bernal Smith, Jr. 



Boston, Massachusetts 




Nickname: C.B.S. 

Occupation: Teacher, Pro Ball 

Likes: Grace, To beat D. Marr at the store. 
The Cloe's Head 

Dislikes: Phil Scott snoring like a bear at 
three in the morning 

Favorite Subjects: English, History 



1969-70: Junior Varsity Football, Junior Varsity Bas- 
ketball (High Scorer Award), Junior Varsity Baseball, 
Junior Athlete Award, Drama Club, Student Council. 
Class Officer 

1970-71: Varsity Football, Varsity Basketball (High 
Scorer Award), Varsity Lacrosse, Student Council, 
Class Officer 

1971-72: Varsity Football (Most Valuable Player Award), 
Varsity Basketball (Captain, High Scorer Award), Var- 
sity Lacrosse (High Scorer Award), Varsity Athlete 
Award, Newspaper Staff, Student Council, Yearbook 
Staff, Class Officer, Chess Club, Music Club, New Dorm 
Supervisor, Weightlifting, Photography Club 

1972-73: Varsity Football (Captain, Most Valuable 
Player Award), Varsity Basketball (Captain, Offense 
Award), Varsity Lacrosse, Yearbook Staff, Newspaper 
Staff, Student Council, Class Officer 



42 




Mark Raymond Stevens 



Lynn, Massachusetts 



1971-72: Soccer, Basketball, Baseball, Seahawk Club, 
Chess Club, Math 54 Award, Spanish Award, English 6 
Award 

1972-73: Soccer, Basketball, Baseball, Seahawk Club, 
Senior Project, Language Award 



Nickname: Einstein 

Occupation: Systems Analyst 

Likes: Sports, Mathematics, Girls 

Dislikes: Breakfast, Missed lay-ups. Clean-ups 

Favorite Subjects: Mathematics, Languages 



43 



^ 



Hiram Rodney Thompson, III 



Dorchester, Massachusetts 




Nickname: Runt 

Occupation: Communications Electronics 

Likes: Earlene, Lottie, Olga, Karate, Swimming, 
Getting Off the Island 

Dislikes: Coming back to the Island, Leaving 
Earlene 

Favorite Subjects: Math, Woodworking 



1969-70: Junior Varsity Football, Hockey, Lacrosse 

1970-71: Varsity Football, Hockey, Lacrosse 

1971-72: Geometry Award, Varsity Football, Junior 
Varsity Basketball, Varsity Lacrosse 

1972-73: Varsity Football, Lacrosse 



44 












CLASS OF 1973 








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SOPHOMORES 




46 




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JUNIORS 



47 



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SOPHOMORES 




ROW 1: Pratt, T.; McClure, T.; Marr, D.; Rose, D.; Gerrlsh, W. 
ROW 2: Neal, E.; Scott, S.; Panniello, T.; Reed, C; McCarthy, D. 
ROW 3: Danforth, R.; Benjamin, J.; Michaud, W.; Davison, G. 





JUNIORS 




ROW 1: Smith, M.; Barboza, S.; Ross, E.; Quinn, J.; Casey, R.; Seaman, P.; Willis, A. 

ROW 2: Bandera, R.; Adams, H.; Blackiemore, M.; Gallagher, J.; Duarte, A.; Wolusky, J.; Clavery, R. 

ROW 3: Norton, R.; DiMaggio, J.; Reynolds, W.; Claytor, A.; DiMascio, E.; Frechette, R.; Riley, D. 






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ATHLETICS 



51 



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FOOTBALL 




ROW 1: Thompson, H.; Bostic, R.; Scott, P. (Captain); Smith, C. (Captain); Seaman, J.; Larson, C. 

ROW 2: Coach McClung, Quinn, J.; Scott, X.; Willis, A.; Seaman, P.; Adams, H.; Barboza, S.; Coach Wellwood 

ROW 3: Barry, D.; Bonas, G.; DIMaggio, J.; Marr, D.; Clavery, R. (Manager) 



The 1972 Thompson Academy football team was lead 
by Senior Co-captains Charles Smith and Phillip Scott to 
an improved 4 win 4 loss season. Although the Seahawks 
were faced with personnel problems throughout the sea- 
son, the sixteen players who remained with the team 
until the end of the season performed impressively. 



The fact that the Thompson team was never defeated 
by a large margin, even by schools with many times 
Thompson's enrollment, reflects credit upon Head Coach 
Robert McClung, his enthusiastic assistants William 
Smart, Thomas Wellwood, and Rafael DelValle, and each 
of the players who contributed so much time, energy, 
and enthusiasm. The Academy is indeed proud of them. 



Thompson 


■ 




Academy 


Opponents 




7 


Hull High School 





13 


Duxbury High School 


16 





Hull High School 


16 


32 


Hyde School 


7 


6 


Lawrence Academy 


14 


12 


St. Sebastian's Country Day S. 


17 


12 


Tyngsboro High School 





28 


Winchendon Academy 


14 



52 



SOCCER 




ROW 1: DiMascio, E.; Gallagher, J.; Wolusky, J.; Stevens, M.; Moritz, A.; Hersey, N.; Frechette, R. 
ROW 2: Coach Peck, Gerrish, W,; Rose, D.; Rose, M.; Harrell, U.; Norton, R.; Coach Quinn 
ROW 3: Michaud, W.; Bandera, R.; Riley, D.; Ross, E.; Reed, C. 



The Thompson Academy soccer team faced its 1972 
schedule with a new coaching staff and a squad which 
was largely composed of new, untried players. Never- 
theless, Coaches William Peck and John Quinn, assisted 
by Co-captains Mark Stevens and Ferdinand Carangelo, 
molded together a strong team. 

Although the Seahawks ended the season with a 5-6-1 
record, the wins and losses only partially reflect the con- 
sistently superior play of Co-captain Carangelo (M.V.P., 
13 goals, 9 assists), goalie Michael Rose (best defensive 
player), and Junior fullback John Wolusky (most im- 
proved player). 



The team line-up featured Nick Hersey and Ulysses 
Harrell on the wings. Mark Stevens and John Gallagher 
filled the inside wing positions, while Fred Carangelo 
worked from the center position. Mike Rose anchored 
the team in goal, with fullbacks John Wolusky and Bob 
Frechette providing defensive help in front of him. 
Flanked by Buddy DiMascio and Wayne Costa, Al Moritz 
controlled the play at midfield from his halfback posi- 
tion. 

Although Thompson is losing four-year lettermen Fred 
Carangelo, Nick Hersey, Mike Rose, Ulysses Harrell, 
Mark Stevens, Al Moritz, and Wayne Costa to the col- 
lege ranks. Head Coach Peck is optimistic for the 
1973 season. 



54 






Thompson 






Academy 


Opponents 




6 


New Preparatory S. 


2 


1 


Beaver Country Day S. 


1 


3 


Portsmouth Abbey 


2 


7 


St. Andrew's School 





1 


Moses Brown School 


4 


3 


Lawrence Academy 
Providence Country 


1 





Day School 


3 





Milton Academy 
Marianapolis Prep. 


2 





School 


3 


1 


Christian High S. 


3 


4 


Belmont Hill School 


2 


1 


Winchendon Academy 


3 



55 



\ 



BASKETBALL 




ROW 1: Smith, M.; Stevens, M.; Smith, C; Reynolds, W.; Salesman, A. 
ROW 2: Scott, X.; Willis, A.; Blackiemore, M.; Brack, P.; Scott, P. 
ROW 3: Munn, M.; Ross, E. (Manager) 
Missing from picture: Keating, W.; Obrien, F. 



The 1972-73 Seahawk basketball team was an effective 
and balanced blend of talent and energy. High scoring 
forwards. Chuck Smith and Mike Munn, shared the re- 
bounding chores with strong-man center Mike Blackie- 
more. The back court men. Bill Reynolds and Mark 
Stevens, demonstrated spectacular play-making through- 
out the season, and whether they were directing a control 
offense, or sparking a fast break, they provided reliable 
team leadership. 



The season's record of nine wins and six losses, coupled 
with a dramatic near-victory in the 1973 Bay State Tour- 
nament, provided season-long excitement for the Thomp- 
son fans. The Seahawks often faced teams representing 
schools with vastly larger enrollments than the seventy 
boys of Thompson Academy, particularly in the year end 
tournament, but the Thompson team was rarely defeated 
and never outplayed. 



Thompson 






Academy 


Opponent 




79 


Huntington Prep 


90 


61 


Duxbury High School 


73 


76 


St. Andrew's School 


74 


90 


Cambridge School 


43 


63 


St. Sebastian's 


52 


60 


St. Andrew's School 


67 


72 


Providence CD. 


47 


57 


Huntington Prep 


63 


73 


Gate of Heaven 


38 


59 


Moses Brown 


65 


66 


Roxbury Latin 


60 


66 


Tabor Academy 


59 


83 


Christian High S. 


37 


62 


New Prep 


74 


92 


Cambridge School 
Bay State Tournament Scores 


81 


95 


Immaculate Con. 


43 


64 


Sandwich High S. 


52 


56 


Rockport High S. 


68 



56 









4.1-" 



v 



J. V. BASKETBALL 




ROW 1: Gallagher, J.; Bostic, R.; Rose, D.; Neal, E.; Costa, W.; Pratt, T. 
ROW 2: Willis, A.; Feeney, B.; Reed, C; Seaman, P.; Clavery, R.; Adams, H. 
ROW 3: Claytor, A. (Manager). 



For the third consecutive year, the Thompson Aca- 
demy Junior Varsity Basketball Team lost no more than 
two games during its three-month season. Coach Allan 
Willis again molded a disciplined team that utilized the 
speed, height, and playmaking ability of its various play- 
ers to the fullest. Sophomore Steve Scott was high 
scorer for the season in addition to supplying countless 
rebounds and strong defensive support in the key. Arnold 
Willis, Paul Seaman, David Rose, and Harold Adams, all 
underclassmen, contributed significantly in each of the 
then victories and all should expect to see varsity action 
next season. 



Thompson 






Academy 


Opponent 




43 


Huntington Prep 


36 


35 


St. Andrew's School 


30 


33 


St. Sebastian's 


32 


54 


Shaw School 


33 


52 


St. Andrew's School 


40 


38 


Providence C. D. 


35 


52 


Huntington 


46 


24 


Moses Brown 


38 


44 


Gavin School 


28 


37 


Roxbury Latin 


28 


41 


Tabor Academy 


53 


38 


Christian High S. 


27 


46 


Cambridge School 


16 



58 



ALUMNI GAME 









K 



HOCKEY 




ROW 1 
ROW 2 
ROW 3 



DiMaggio, J.; DiMascio, E.; Casey, R.; Riley, D. 

Marr, D.; Carangelo, F.; Thompson, H.; Rose, M. 

Gerrish, W. (Manager); Hersey, IM.; Benjamin, M.; McClure, T.; Coach Paige 



The Thompson Seahawks started their season in early January and skated 
poorly. By the end of the month things looked better. Although Thompson 
did not win any games, the players thoroughly enjoyed the season. It must 
also be noted that Thompson lost six of 12 games by one goal. 

Coach Paige molded together two strong lines out of his 15-man squad. 
Captain Bob Casey anchored the defense and was always a scoring threat. 
The first line consisted of Doug Marr, Dan Riley, and Fred Carangelo. The 
line provided Thompson with most of its offensive power. The second line 
featured Mike Benjamin at center with Buddy DiMascio and Tom McClure 
taking up the wings. 

The defensive pairs were Bob Casey and Tony Duarte with Joe Quinn and 
Hiram Thompson defending for the second line. 

In light of the fact that Thompson only skated three hours per week, the 
team improved immeasurably. The Seahawks will only lose high scorer Fred 
Carangelo through graduation and the chances for a winning season next 
year are quite good. 



60 









il 



•% \', y -J—^- 




V '^- 



■'v 



BASEBALL 




ROW 1: Reed, C; Stevens, M.; Gallagher, J.; DiMaggio, J.; Carey, D. 
ROW 2: Benjamin, M.; Feeney, B.; Connor, M.; Conte, M. 
ROW 3: DiMascio, E.; Reynolds, W.; Wolusky, J.; Keating, W. 



The 1973 Thompson Academy baseball team includes much new talent, and Coaches Allan Willis 
and John Horan expect to have a highly successful season. Returning lettermen Bill Reynolds, Mark 
Stevens, Brian Feeney, and John Gallagher complement sluggers Mike Connor, Matt Conte and Joe 
DiMaggio, pitching wizards Calvin Reed and Bill Keating, and fielding stalwarts John Wolusky, Mike 
Benjamin, and David Carey. 

If theSeahawk nine can play with the enthusiasm and unity demonstrated by the 1972 team, they 
will reflect only the highest credit on Thompson Academy athletics. 



62 



LACROSSE 




ROW 1 : Rose, D.; Thompson, H.; Smith, C; Rose, M.; Scott, X.G.; Hersey, N.; Scott, S. 

ROW 2: Coach DelValle; Duarte, A.; Adams, H.; Seaman, P.; Smith, M.; Salesman, A.; Bostic, R.; Coach McClung, 

ROW 3: Seaman, J.; Scott, P.; Munn, M. 



The 1973 lacrosse team, coached by Robert McClung and Rate DelValle, is faced with a challenging 
schedule that includes Tabor Academy, Moses Brown, Noble and Greenough and Rivers Country Day. 
Fortunately, the twenty-two man squad includes six four-year lettermen, and several highly talented 
newcomers. 

An unusually early spring has afforded the lacrosse team two extra weeks of practice time, and 
hopes are high for an undefeated season. 



63 



r 








ACTIVITIES 



65 



K 



AFRO-AMERICAN SOCIETY 




This year at Thompson an Afro-American Society was initiated. It has proven very worthwhile in 
that it projects a "big brother" image to many of the young black students. 

The founder of the Society, Ulysses Norman Harrell, was elected president. The other officers 
included: Vice President Michael Rose, Secretary X.G. Scott, and Treasurer Mark Smith. The rep- 
resentatives are Alan Salesman and Robert Bostic. 

The main goal of the Society was to bring about cooperation and understanding between the black 
students on the Island. Black literature and Afro-American culture played a large part in the edu- 
cational program of the Society. 

Thanks for the success of the Society are due to Mr. Wright as well as our main advisers, Mr. 
Harold Smith and Rafael DelValle. 



66 



GOLF 




r'^ 




67 



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VIEWS OF THE CITY 





68 






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i 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



CALVIN PAGE BARTLETT 
Chairman of the Corporation 



Ben Ames Williams, Jr., President 
George Lewis, Vice President 
Henry Lyman, Vice President 
Bartlett Harwood, Jr., Treasurer 
John B. Pierce, Jr., Secretary 
Eleanor C. Canavan, Asst. Treasurer 

John Q. Adams 
Calvin Page Bartlett 
Thomas G. Brown, Jr. 
Walter M. Cabot 
Nathaniel T. Dexter 
Patrick Grant 
Hon. Henry M. Leen 
Philip H. Lord 
Arthur G. Miller, Ed. D. 
Joshua L. Miner III 
Hon. Joseph S. Mitchell, Jr. 
Edward V. Osberg 
Guido R. Perera, Jr. 
Robert Stone 
Raymond Thomas 
Howland S. Warren 
David D. Wicks 
Moses Williams 



73 



SCHOOL DIRECTORY 



SOPHOMORE 



CLASS 



Danforth, Ronald 
Davison, Gregory 
Feeney, Brian 
Gerrish, Wayne 
Marr, Douglas 
McCarthy, Donald 
McClure, Thomas 
Neal, Eddie 
Panniello, Thomas 
Powell, Stephen 
Pratt, Timothy 
Reed, Calvin 
Rose, David 
Scott, Stephen 
Zupofska, David 



19 Lithgow Street, Dorchester, Mass. 02124 

312 E. Washington Street, Hanson, Mass. 02341 

1 Ross Place, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

128 Bay Street, Hull, Mass. 02045 

10 Emerson PL, Charles River Park, Boston, Mass. 02114 

617 Harrison Avenue, Boston, Mass. 02118 

321 Dorchester Street, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

10 Sterling Square, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

6 Glendale Drive, Nashua, New Hampshire 03060 

32 Morrison Street, Medford, Mass. 02155 

1302 Commonwealth Avenue, Allston, Mass. 02124 

Cheshire County Turnpike Rd., Drewsville, New Hampshire 03604 

87 West Cottage St., Roxbury, Mass. 02125 

32 O'Bierne Place, Roxbury, Mass. 02119 

138 Orton Marotta Way, South Boston, Mass. 02127 



JUNIOR 



CLASS 



Adams, Harold 
Bandera, Robert 
Barboza, Stanley 
Blackiemore, Michael 
Casey, Robert 
Clavery, Roderick 
Claytor, Archie 
Conte, Matthew 
DiMaggio, Joseph 
DiMascio, Eugene 
Duarte, Antonio 
Frechette, Robert 
Gallagher, John 
Keating, William 
Norton, Robert 
O'Brien, Frederick 
Quinn, Joseph 
Reynolds, William 
Riley, Daniel 
Ross, Erroll 
Schaufus, David 
Seaman, Paul 
Smith, Mark 
Willis, Arnold 
Wolusky, John 



1170 Tremont Street, Roxbury, Mass. 02120 

8 Fernald Terrace, Dorchester, Mass. 02125 

60 Archdale Road, Roslindale, Mass. 02131 

7 Orton Marotta Way, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

86 M Street, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

445 Macon Street, Brooklyn, New York 11233 

97 Ruthven Street, Roxbury, Mass. 02121 

98 Woburn Street, Reading, Mass. 01867 

561 East Sixth Street, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

97 Dakota Street, Dorchester, Mass. 02124 

63 Dewey Street, Dorchester, Mass. 02125 

1198 Stratford Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 06607 

89 Parker Street, Chelsea, Mass. 02150 

109 Joyce Hayes Way, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

180 Tremont Street, Duxbury, Mass. 02332 

169 West Ninth Street, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

1 King Street, Dorchester, Mass. 02122 

34 Sydney Street, Dorchester, Mass. 02125 

18 Boylston Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 02130 

54 Copeland Street, Roxbury, Mass. 02119 

3557 Washington Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 02130 

35 Cowie Street, Newport, Rhode Island 02840 
25 Msgr. Reynolds Way, Boston, Mass. 02118 
434 Mt. Pleasant Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15214 
P. O. Box 127, South Boston, Mass. 02127 



74 



SENIOR 
CLASS 



Barry, Daniel 
Bittrich, John 
Bonas, Gerald 
Bostic, Robert 
Brack, Paul 
Carangelo, Ferdinand 
Carey, Wayne 
Connor, Michael 
Costa, Wayne 
Harrell, Ulysses 
Hersey, Nikolay 
Larson, Carl 
Luciano, John 
Moritz, Albert 
Munn, Michael 
Rose, Michael 
Salesman, Alan 
Scott, Glen 
Scott, Phillip 
Seaman, James 
Smith, Charles 
Stevens, Mark 
Thompson, Hiram 



13 Maryvale Road, Burlington, Mass. 01803 
32 Oak Square Avenue, Brighton, Mass. 02135 
77 Harding Road, Fairhaven, Mass. 02719 
34-35 12th Street, Long Island City, N.Y. 11101 
66 Orton Marotta Way, South Boston, Mass. 02127 
382 North Street, Boston, Mass. 02113 
8 Burke Street, South Boston, Mass. 02127 

31 Patterson Way, South Boston, Mass. 02127 
42 Rounds Street, New Bedford, Mass. 02740 
P. O. Box 127, South Boston, Mass. 02127 
160 Forest Street, Melrose, Mass. 02176 

49 Grove Road, Natick, Mass. 01760 
11 Druid Hill Avenue, Burlington, Mass. 01803 
485 Pond Street, Woonsocket, R. I. 02895 
41 Walnut Park, Roxbury, Mass. 02119 
160 Forest Street, Melrose, Mass. 02176 
75 Homestead Street, Roxbury, Mass. 02121 
92 Seventh Avenue, Newark, N.J. 07104 

32 O'Bierne Place, Roxbury, Mass. 02119 
35 Cowie Street, Newport, R. I. 02840 

25 Msgr. Reynolds Way, Boston, Mass. 02118 
60 Burrill Avenue, Lynn, Mass. 01902 
20 Ames Street, Dorchester, Mass. 02124 



75 



\ 



SENIOR PLANS 



Barry, Daniel 
Bittrich, John 
Bonas Gerald 

Bostic, Robert 
Brack, Paul 
Carangelo, Ferdinand 
Carey, David 
Connor, Michael 
Costa, Wayne 
Harrell, Ulysses 
Larson, Carl 
Luciano, John 
Moritz, Albert 
Munn, Michael 
Rose, Michael 
Salesman, Alan 
Scott, Glen 
Scott, Phillip 
Seaman, James 
Smith Charles 
Stevens, Mark 
Thompson, Hiram 



Middlebury College 
Northeastern University 
Loyola College (Montreal) 

Graham Junior College 

University of Massachusetts 

Villanova University 

U. S. Army 

U. S. Postal Service 

Southeastern Massachusetts University 

Northeastern University 

General Motors School 

Coyne Institute 

Johnson & Wales College 

Boston College 

Boston University 

United States Air Force Academy 

Fairleigh Dickinson University 

Boston University 

Hampton Institute 

St. Thomas More School 

Brown University 

Graham Junior College 



76 



PATRONS 



Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Claytor 

Mr. Nathaniel T. Dexter 

Mrs. Norma E. Audsley 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Casey 

Mr. John B. Pierce, Jr. 

Mrs. Marie V. Adams 

Mr. Howland S. Warren 

Mrs. Edward Sulhvan 

The Big Brother Association 

Mr. and Mrs. Welton G. Davison 



77 



Congra tula tions 


REARDON'S FLOWER 


To The Class of 


SHOP 


1973 


700 EAST BROADWAY 




SOUTH BOSTON, MASS. 


MR. and MRS. CHARLES BAXTER 


268-4550 



Thompson Academy wants help 



to keep Boston Harbor 



Clean 



Best Wishes 
from a 



Friend 



78 



Compliments of 

Doherty, Blacker & Shepard 
Lumber Companies 





imnsUmt 


1 ^ 


^^■^H 




m 


^m/ 11,^^ 


ss 


E. B. GIVEN 


M 




^^^^ 


& 


m 


■■•pi ^' J|'->' 




SONS INC. 


u 


-^ 


. '7fl 


HhL 





WILLIAM M. BAILEY CO 



Genera/ Contractors 



BOSTON, MASS. 



C. G. EDWARDS 

& 
CO. INC. 



Compliments of 
A Friend 



79 



'\ 






Completely Equipped to Handle Maine Shrimp 










Finest Facilities at Rockland 

for Docking, Unloading 

icing and Fueling 

at our Modern Processing Plant 

DEALER FOR 

TEXACO MARINE PRODUCTS 
CRYSTAL CLEAR ICE 

in BLOCKS or CRUSHED 

NEW SERVICE PROVIDES 
TRUCK RE-ICING BY BLOWER 

24 hours a day 



F. J. O HARA & SONS, INC 

OF ROCKLAND 
PRODUCERS and Distributors of Fresh and Frozen Seafood 



Tillson Avenue 



ROCKLAND, MAINE 04841 



Tel. 207-594.4444 



Complete Stock of BRITISH ROPES TRAWLING WIRE 



Distributors Of 

Mobil 

MARINE PRODUCTS 

Tanker Service 
for Boston Harbor Area 



Plus a Full Line of 
TRAWLING EQUIPMENT & FISHING SUPPLIES 

for all your needs 



Natural Fiber and Synthetic Netting 



Now serving as Fish and Shrimp Brokers 
for Domestic & Foreign Producers 



Manila and Polypropylene Rope 



F. J. OHARA & SONS INC 



Stock also carried at 

ROCKAND, MAINE 

Tel. 207-594-4444 



211 NORTHERN AVENUE BOSTON, MASS. 02210 

Telephones: 617-542-4816 or 617-542-5713 



Home phones: 

Bradley O'Hara 696-6764 

Tom Norris 698-5785 



80 




[ 



i 

I 






1 



Thompson 
Academy 

Established 1814 
Thompson's Island Boston, Massachusetts 02127 



Since 1814, Thompson Academy has remained un- 
ique among New England independent schools. Its set- 
ting on Thompson's island, a 157-acre wilderness pre- 
serve located in Boston Harbor, has offered to its stu- 
dents a range of opportunity unmatched by any other 
American school. The school's proximity to Boston 
provides the boys with direct exposure to the resources 
of a large city, yet the island's removal from the main- 
ind provides an atmosphere that combines a sense of 
kdventure with a sense of community. 

The school's uniqueness lies in its variety of students 
From different backgrounds. Many of the boys have 
experienced difficulties because of problems in their 
previous environments. The goal is to give these stu- 
dents a chance to develop their potential in a comfort- 
able learning environment. If they demonstrate their 
willingness to take advantage of the opportunities af- 
forded them, they are welcomed. The Academy's aim 
is to show each student some measure of his own dig- 
nity and then to bring him as far as possible toward a 
responsible and creative maturity with confidence in 
his personal capabilities. 

The island, the sea, and the city have combined to 
enable the Academy to pioneer a multi-phased ap- 
proach to education. A sound college preparatory pro- 
gram enables accelerated students to enter the college 
of their choice, while diversified general and remedial 
programs afford other boys a tailored curriculum that 
makes maximum use of the Academy's precious urban- 
island location. 



Program of Studies 



>ra I 
Jral Science 

r 

^B>odworking 
^Kto Mechanics 
^Kreign Langua 
Remedial Readi 
Remedial Mathe 



Grade 10 

English 
bra II 
logy 

rid History 
ctives: 

od working 
to Mechanic 

Languages 
anography 




Grade 11 

English 

Geometry 

Chemistry 

American History 

Electives: 

Art 

Woodworking 

Foreign Languages 

Photography 

Oceanography 

Advanced Biology 



■nglish 
Trigonometry 






luropean History 
Electives: 

forking 

jages 
iphy 
id Biok>cjy 

^1 Studies S^ 
Proiect 
>mput6r 









i\ 



w 



." i-. <-, 



rvKvl" • . '■* . • 'J '" I- - 



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Thompson Academy Varsity and Junior Varsity teams compete 
with public and private schools throughout New England in the fol 
lowing sports: 



Fall 

Football 
Soccer 



Winter 

Hockey 
Basketball 



Spring 

Baseball 
Lacrosse 
Golf 



Additional facilities and instruction are available for intramural 
athletics in the following areas: 



Weightlifting 

Karate 

Tennis 



Swimming 
Camping 
Team sports 



Th< 



\', .'i 1 r .* --.til 



1 i t r 



iVK 



^ Neponset Indians m 1626 in II 
quired the island which was then turne 
Boston Asylum for Indigent Boys '^vn/pff <■ 
Boston to Thompson's Island wheie a fa- 
proved for 1^^^tt^^_ 

The present school complex consists of eight buildini 
tones with classrooms and living facilities for 120 boys, the riayaut 
nasium, Bowditch Hall which houses the dining room, the infirmary and 
the admmistrative offices, Gardiner Halt, which includes the school li- 
brary and assembly hall, and a science laboratory building which also 
contains a complete woodworking shop. In addition to these structures, 
there are several other buildings that serve as staff housinq and storage 
areas for maintenance equipment. 

The athletic fields and buildings are located on a rolling plateau in the 
center of the island. The southern half of the island is mostly lowland, 
a considerable portion of which is excellent saltwater marsh. The tidal 
ponds and salt marshes are teeming with a wide variety of wildlife. Fish 
and clams, migratory fowl, and a great variety of songbirds feed in the 
marsh, which is extremely rich in nutrients. Open fields from the aban- 
doned farm, several good stands of hard and softwood trees, and apple 
and peach orchards make Thompson's Island a most attractive location 
for the academy. 



Admissions 



Thompson Academy welcomes applications 
from ambitious young men of dependable char- 
acter and proven ability. Application forms 
can be obtained by calling or writing to the: 

Admissions Office 

Thompson Academy 

Box 127 

South Boston, Massachusetts 02127 

(617) 328-1884 
in order to afford each applicant's record a 
thorough evaluation, a health history form, a 
scholarship aid form, three recommendation 
forms, and a personal interview at the school 
are considered, in addition to the personal ap- 
plication form, by an Admissions Committee 
which includes the headmaster, the director 
of admissions, and three trustees of the acad- 
emy. The Admissions Office is open from 
8:30 - 4:30 weekdays, and interview appoint- 
ments must be arranged in advance by tele- 
phone. 



Faculty 



The Thompson Academy faculty includes fourteen 
full-time teachers, and a varying number of part-time 
counselors, aides, and technicians, each of whom is 
dedicated to the positive development of young men. 
Mr. John D. Pinto was appointed headmaster in June 
1973 after serving as director of curriculum for four 
of his six previous years of affiliation with the school. 
A graduate of Tabor Academy and Columbia College, 
with graduate work at the Honeywell Computer Insti- 
tute, and University of Rhode Island, and Boston Uni- 
versity, Mr. Pinto is representative of most Thomp- 
son Academy faculty members. Many have had teach- 
ing or student experience in leading private boarding 
schools, all have graduated from superior colleges and 
universities (most with graduate degrees), and every 
faculty and staff member has fully demonstrated his 
educational expertise and commitment to compassion- 
ate teaching before being appointed to his position. 




^ 



I 




Schools Attended 




Undergraduate 

Columbia 

Williams 

Maine 

Lehigh 

George Williams 

University of Rhode Island 

Acadia 

Denison 

Western State 

Northeastern 

Yale 

Middlebury 



Graduate 
Harvard 

Boston University 
University of Rhode Island 
University of Connecticut 
Acadia 

Honeywell institute 
Western State 

University of Massachusetts 
Northeastern 



ii 



87 



School liistory 



''^'^' mn^on Arad»?mv h the fifth oldest independent 

ogland. The Academy was 
2 Boston rj for indigent 

boys, principally to afford protection and support" 
'^ *^° -^ons of local families that had suffered from con- 
brought about by the War of 1812, and were 
therefore unable to supply proper guidance or support 
to their pre- or early adolescent sons 

A number of philanthropic Bostonians aeciaea eariy 
in 1813 to establish a "home school" for such boys to 
provide them with food, shelter, education, and direc- 
tion. Descendents of many of the original funding 
families remain active members of the Thompson Aca- 
demy Board of Trustees. 

In 1832, a second, similarly oriented school was 
independently incorporated as the Boston Farm 
School, and Thompson's Island in Boston Harbor was 
purchased from the city of Dorchester for its setting. 

Because the objectives of the Boston Asylum- for 
Indigent Boys and the Boston Farm School were much 
alike, and because the living facilities of the Asylum 
were becoming increasingly crowded in its single brick 
building in Boston's West End, a joint petition was pre- 
sented to the General Court of Massachusetts for an 
Act uniting the two schools into one, the Boston Asy- 
lum and Farm School for Indigent Boys. 

The assets of the former Asylum School were liqui- 
dated, and thus, a solid financial base upon which the 
new school would establish its future growth was pro- 
vided. The new school continued to serve needy boys 
of good character and to provide a year-round home, 
academic instruction, and a thorough appreciation of 
manual and industrial arts and the principles of agri- 
culture. 

During the 19th century the school enlarged its 
campus, its combined academic/agricultural/vocational 
program and its student body and staff. In 1907, the 
school name was changed to the Farm and Trades 
School; however, the school's orientation and program 
remained unchanged 

One of the most distinctive extracurricular activities 
of the early Farm and Trades School had its inception 
in 1857. According to school historian Raymond W. 
StanJey, some 12 boys were casually amusing them- 
selves one afternoon creating musical sounds through 
combs covered with tissue paper. They were soon 
joined by three boys with violins, and this group of 
15 began to schedule informal meetings on a regular 
basis. In THE FOUR THOMPSONS, Stanley writes: 
"A bass violin, saxhorn, cornopean, and drum were 
added to form the nucleus of what became, that same 
year, the first school band in America." The Greek 
philosopher Plato suggested in the REPUBLIC that 
musical instruction for young people would impart to 
them an important sense of rhythm and harmony to 
broaden and to supplement a classical education. It 
was the boys of the early Farm and Trades School, 
however, that were to finally implement this platonic 
concept. 



In T95'' ^ 


1 I- 


son's I':' ' 
lar chd 


lOth fr. 


cess ot 
for 




its nan 




gram 
devf^!i 




depart 




piu 
buiidii 




trpe 





■n Thomp- 



tifig, poultry 

Additionally, 
a full curriculuin ut aoaue) 
school days included four ! 
hoi training, ai 

nough r 
vigorous program i 
enthusiastic alumni. 

By 1955, however, 
determined that a disproi 
then recent graduates had le 
Thompson's Island only to litiu 
somewhat obsolete skills were nr 
as they had been in ar 
Board of Trustees elected t( 
school to Thompson Acadnn 
to include the full four y 
modify and intensify 
insofar as was possibii 
boy to a variety of prs 

The formula has beeit i* 
farm program ended in 19. 
fire which destroyed the mar 
equipment, and some live 
trial arts courses— glazing, prmi; 
poultry dressing, etc —were also 

lack of trdiTi; . , J andd; 

social interest. Yet, evei. 
became more and more gear 
Thompson Acar'prnv has ro, 
importance of w 
opmenr. 

In 1973, each student 
tion of a daily work a<r':^ 
the school boat; otht i dc. 
with the preparation and sei 
others are engaged 
that range from custoaial work 
addition to a boy's work pror^r 
the opportunity to take form 
try, sloyd, and auto mechan 
version of the original study-work-play 
mains very much intact, and Thompson Ac<iuci • ly a' «u 
uates of the 1970's continue to be as manuallv canable 
as they are well prepared for higher ed 



^KIIIS. 



na\ of the 
■getable caiinunj, 
'lated hecaiJ5R nf 



)dified 



School Life 





DAILY SCHEDULE 

The daily schedule for each student is planned to pro- 
vide a certain amount of free time between responsibili- 
ties to allow the student time to pursue extracurricular 
activities. 



Breakfast 
Classes 
Lunch 
Classes 
Athletics 
Dinner 
Study Hall 
Lights Out 



7:00 a.m.- 7:20 a.m. 

8:00 a.m.- 12:00 a.m. 

12:00 p.m.- 1:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m.- 2:30 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 

7:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 
10:15 p.m. 



The school year is dividied into three terms. The fall 
term begins on the first Sunday after Labor Day and con- 
tinues until Christmas. The winter term runs from Janu- 
ary through the middle of March, and the spring term 
begins in April and ends at graduation in early June. 

GRADES 

Progress grades are reported to the students every five 
weeks to provide each student with an awareness of his 
standing at mid-term. Each term ends with an examina- 
tion period in which the student takes a two hour final 
examination in each of his courses. At that time the 
grades are sent home to the students' parents or guardian. 

VACATIONS 

There is a two week vacation at the end of each term 
in addition to a five-day Thanksgiving vacation and all 
state and national Monday holidays. 



90 



Students are encouraged to participate in the many 
clubs and activities that are available to them at the 
Academy. Additionally, the resources of Boston's uni- 
versities and cultural centers are easily accessible from 
Thompson's Island by public transportation, and every 
attempt is made to arrange for the students' atten- 
dance at local sports and cultural events. 

There are facilities available on the Island for pho- 
tography, wilderness survival training, karate, swim- 
ming, boating, card and board games, and literary and 
artistic pursuits. Off- Island, the South Boston Boy's 
Club, the Boston University Reading Clinic, the Habi- 
tat School and all local public and university Jibraries 
are available to Thompson Academy students on a 
scheduled basis. Frequently, outstanding entertainers 
and lecturers visit the Island to offer cultural supple- 
ments to the daily program. 

The Thompson Academy schedule includes a degree 
of emphasis on extracurricular activities to ensure that 
each student will enjoy the maximum opportunity to 
expand his range of interest and to fully benefit from 
all that the metropolitan Boston area can offer. 



THIRD THURSDAY 

The highly successful "Third Thursday" program 
has become an integral part of the Thompson Academy 
curriculum. In 1971, history teacher Robert McClung 
initiated a program of student field trips to area his- 
torical sites and museums on the third Thursday of 
each month during the school year. Because the Aca- 
demy wishes to maximize the opportunity for stu- 
dents to benefit from the vast cultural resources of 
the Boston area, all classes are suspended on third 
Thursdays, and each faculty member leads a group of 
students to a site or event of particular mutual interest. 




SENIOR PROJECTS 

In the spring of a student's senior year, he is permit- 
ted to take part in an independent project of his own 
choosing. These projects range in scope from research- 
ing an area of particular interest to doing volunteer 
work in the many schools and agencies in Boston. Dur- 
ing this period^ the student spends mornings off the 
Island and returns in the afternoon for sports and meet- 
ings with his adviser. 



91 



College Acceptances 



American International College 

Amherst 

Boston College 

Boston State College 

Boston University 

Brandeis 

Brandywine 

Bridgeport 

Bridgewater State 

Brown 

Clark 

Colby 

Columbia 

Connecticut 

Curry 

Ford ham 

George Williams College 

Grahm Junior College 

Harvard 

Hobart 

Idaho 



Kansas 

Long Island University 

Loyola of Montreal 

Maine 

Massachusetts at Amherst 

Massachusetts at Boston 

Montana 

Nathaniel Ha\A^horne 

New Hampshire 

Northeastern 

Northern Arizona State 

Providence College 

Rhode Island 

Ricker 

Rollins 

Saint Francis 

Saint Michael's 

Suffolk 

Tampa 

University of the Pacific 

Worcester Junior College 





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S.fft.A. 



Donations 




Thompson Academy was incorporated, not for 
profit, in 1814, and the school has since remained 
privately endowed and supported. Each year, the 
Development Office appeals to a list of friends of 
the school, alumni, and parents for contributions. 
Additionally, charitable and educational founda- 
tions are periodically solicited for funding particular 
programs. 

Gifts to the Academy are fully tax deductible 
and will be gratefully acknowledged. Checks should 
be made payable to: 

Thompson Academy 

Thompson's Island 

South Boston, Massachusetts 02127 



93 



Trustees 



Calvin Page Bartlett, 
Chairman of the Corporation 

Ben Ames Williams, Jr., President 

George Lewis, Vice-President and Assistant Secretary 

Henry Lyman, Vice-President 

Bartlett Harwood, Jr., Treasurer 

John B. Pierce, Jr., Secretary 

Eleanor C. Canavan, Assistant Treasurer 

John Q. Adams 
Thomas G. Brown, Jr. 
Walter M. Cabot 
Nathaniel T. Dexter 
Patrick Grant 
Hon. Henry M. Leen 
Philip H. Lord 
Arthur G. Miller 
Joshua L. Miner III 
Hon. Joseph S. Mitchell, Jr. 
Edward V. Osberg 
Guido R. Perera 
John W. Sears 
Robert H. Stone 
Raymond Thomas 
Howland S. Warren 
David D. Wicks 
Moses Williams 



Advisory Committee 



Erwin D. Canham 

Rev. John Crocker 

Paul G. Day 

George A. Douglas, Jr. 

Harold W. Edwards 

Hon. John J. Finnegan 

Thomas E. Goode 

Harry Gulesian 

Miss Anne P. Halliday 

Bayard Henry 

Mrs. John Homans 

Eliot Hubbard III 

George N. Hurd, Jr. 

Joseph L. Kennedy, M.D. 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Francis J. Lally 

Augustus P. Loring 

John Lowell 

Louis G. Maglio 

Houghton D. Pearl 

Hon. John E. Powers 

Hon. Leverett Saltonstall 

Winfield A. Schuster 

Thomas K. Sisson 

John Stetson 

Herbert G. Stokinger 

Lawrence Terry 

Philip H. Theopold 

James W. Wickenden 

Hon. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 



94 



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